Article about dating abuse

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We should be working to shift power back to them.” Here are some things you can do, according to loveisrespect.org: Listen.Be available for your teen to talk to and offer support. We and the millions of people who use this non-profit website to prevent and escape domestic violence rely on your donations. Sometimes teens feel more comfortable talking to other teens.“You can see the partner grab their hand in that way,” says New York college student Trendha Hunter, a member of loveisrespect’s teen advisory board.Consider that kiss by the lockers: Sign of affection or statement of ownership?Learn more about how to talk to your son or daughter about healthy relationships and dating violence in “Healthy, Unhealthy or Abusive?Adults coo about puppy love, or shrug at the infatuations of teenagers. Flip through a mag: See 17-year-old Kardashian sib Kylie Jenner pairing up with 25-year-old rapper Tyga. Or, turn on the radio: Hear Justin Bieber crooning to his “prize possession.” Add in 24/7 access to hand-held technology, including apps that geo-track a sweetheart’s every move, and it is no wonder that nearly 20,000 13- to 17-year-olds reached out to the hotline last year.

“If you say, ‘I forbid you to see this person,’ how well do you think that’s going to go? “Also, as parents, we have to think about what dating violence goes back to. If your teen is in an abusive relationship, we shouldn’t also be stripping power and control away from them.

Of those, more than half of the victims said they were also physically abused.

Adults Are Doing It, Too It’s not surprising to Cameka Crawford, chief communications officer at The National Domestic Violence Hotline, to hear that teen abusers are increasingly using technology to harass their partners, considering the same is true among adult abusers.

The importance of this issue is why dozens of NEA members participated in a workshop, led by Sarah Colomé of Break the Cycle, at the NEA Joint Conference on Concerns of Women and Minorities last year.

“You have this unique and powerful connection to students that not a lot of other adults do,” Colomé says.

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